Mother Nature was more than a little moody over the weekend and dumped tons of rain in Lawton, Fort Sill. This of course train wrecked everyone's plans and more than a few events and plans were cancelled and ruined. The Big & Rich concert at Hillary Farms, Lake Lawtonka was cancelled and the City of Lawton was barely able to hold their annual Freedom Festival. There were rain delays, but the fireworks show eventually happened. All in all it was a very wet and miserable weekend outdoors and it's not over yet...

If you've taken a look at this week's forecast there's more rain headed our way. Or at least a strong percentage for rain over the next several days. Unless things change or improve Lawton, Fort Sill could be seeing even more rain. There's a 50% chance or higher everyday this week through Friday. After this weekend's downpour and all the flooding that happened around town getting more rain certainly won't help matters. Several people had to evacuate their homes on the East side in the Garden Village area or neighborhood. Rescue personnel were kept busy all Sunday helping people and stranded motorists.

Stay weather aware this week and make sure you stay safe out there. As the old saying goes: "Turn around, don't drown." Avoid low lying areas and standing water were depth and current is unknown. Some areas of town flood very quickly and as much rain as we've seen the ground is full, so any more rain is sure to cause flooding. Hopefully the forecast improves and we'll have a sunny and nice July Fourth weekend. I wouldn't bet on it though. Either way I'll be on the grill regardless of what Mother Nature is up to...

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.